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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomatic conversations in cairo, and what is on the table? what terms are being discussed? >> well, two central issues from the two perspectives. the head of the hamas today held a press conference in which he highlighted hamas position, and that is simple in their eyes, israel must stop all hostilities against the leadership and assassinating and killing key palestinian figures and call on the international community to
, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo, almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo which were prompted, of course, by the video. what we think then transpired in benghazi is that opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. >> so there you have it. what do you think about that, and what role does that statement by her make in the concern about her qualifications? >> yeah. you know, chris, one of the things that's amplified some of the concerns around this is we had a classified briefing with about 65 or 70 senators on september the 20th, and i assure you if you were there, you would have thought it was one of the most bizarre briefings ever where we had four, you know, distinguished people there who shared like no information. i was in libya about a week after that. it was a preplanned trip. i didn't go there because of benghazi. obviously benghazi was a big topic, and i sat there with our station chief, our head intelligence person who was there serving after the ambassador had bee
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
in cairo? >> good afternoon, tamron. well egyptian officials have met with the leaders of the two major palestinian factions engaged in this military operation with israel. they're trying to get them to commit to a cessation of hostility force a period of 48 hours to allow for a longer truce to go into effect. the palestinians feel they have the upper hand here, and they are saying they will not stop their attacks into southern israel so long as israel maintains a siege on gaza. they want it lifted and they want guaranteed backed by the international community that israel will no longer engage and target and kill senior leaders of the palestinian factions here in gaza. they want all of these demands guaranteed by the international community. for its part israel wants to approach it from a different angle. they want a complete cessation of hostilities for 38 hours for so followed by a -- other concerns they have. the challenge for egypt is to try and close that gap as quickly as possible because essentially everyone here feels that they're running out of time. you have the israelis amass
to meet with leaders in jerusalem as well as cairo and ramallah. few details have been provided in a news conference an hour ago. >> we are all hoping for a deescalation and we are all hoping for restoration of calm, and we are all hoping to open space, for deeper, broader conversations. >> now, the death and the destruction caused by the crisis stretches across both borders. more than 100 confirmed killed in gaza. four in israel including an israeli soldier who died in a rocket strike today. we want to get more from nbc correspondent, ayman mohyeldin, who joins me from gaza. you reached out to the egyptian authorities about what's taking place, when this deal will be announced. what are you hearing about the possibility of that happening this hour? >> well, right now what we're hearing from egyptian officials is that they're still working to finalize that agreement. there are some areas where the gap between the two sides has been narrowed, but there are still some very important issues that have not been addressed. you know, we are talking about trying to solve one of the most complex i
-fire for israel and hamas. any details have yet to be worked out. the next direct talks happen in k cairo. meanwhile, the military is not commenting on the long oh-range rockets, the same type that were fired into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)